Audrey Hepburn in my mail

 

My next postcard comes from Rebecca in London.

We met the first time in Germany in 2004 at a mutual friends house and have since become close friends. I have visited her in London several times, she has come to Sweden several times and we have travelled together to both India and the U.S.
I last saw her when I visited London in march and had a really nice dinner with her and her wonderful daughter Saskia.

The back of the postcard says:

 

Hi Matthew

I chose this postcard because it symbolizes beauty, elegance and grace. Since I was a little girl, Audrey Hepburn has been my inspiration. And recently, I found out that we share the same birthday!

Love

/Rebecca

 

Rocco di Montepiggiolo

 

The next postcard is from Mrs. Frisk, a friend I got to know a couple of years ago when she started dating one of my closest friends, Johan. First time we met, she got the impression that I disliked her, but what she didn’t know, was that her new boyfriend had given me too many cocktails the night before and therefore I was a bit grumpy and tired and not in a party mood.
Since then, we have become good friends.

The text on the postcard says:

Rocca di Montepiggiolo

This photo is from an old fortress in Italy. The quality is not that good since I took it with my old Eriksson T68i cell phone, but I still love it. To me, this fortress symbolizes a place to just be, an adventure and joy.

Hugs!
Mrs. Frisk

The photo also prove that a cell phone can take great pictures in good light (although the quality of this one is not that great because it is a photo of a printed photo).
If you go into a store, often they show you how many megapixels a camera has, but nowadays, this is largely irrelevant. This might have been interesting information when digital cameras first arrived on the market, but the last 6-7 years all cameras are enough for most people. Instead, too many megapixels might actually make the photo worse since a 12 megapixel cell phone camera is too large for the tiny sensor inside.

Despite this, the megapixel myth has survived as a marketing tool to people who doesn’t know what it is. It is easier to refere to a irrelevant number than to tell them what is good about the optics, sensor etc.