Kids

I have always been scared of kids. Always felt completely lost when they are around. Earlier in my life I was afraid of everything that you couldn’t calculate or control beforehand. And children is not very easy to control.
Coming here means to hang out with Yara and Liam, six and three years old (soon). At first they were a bit shy, but after a day or two, we are now best pals, just like last time I saw them in California in July.

If you are not used to it, you get tired pretty quickly. They don’t. It is probably easier somehow when you are in the middle of it, but I can’t help admiring parents to small kids.
I have learnt the hard way the first rule with dealing with kids. Prepare them for change. Do not just turn off the tv when you think they are finished, but explain earlier that they can only watch another episode. Most of the time you can avoid kicking and screaming.
This might be obvious for anyone with experience dealing with kids, but you got to start somewhere, right?

If you think about it, the difference between kids and adults are not that big. We don’t like change either most of the time.
We all know what we have. Even if we might be unhappy with it, we can usually deal with it anyway. But all change mean you take a risk. It might get better or worse, but we rather focus on the bad stuff. Therefore we avoid a multitude of possibilities only because there is a small chance that things might go horribly wrong. Success usually mean a willingness to fail completely, yet get up and try again.

That is why people in the west is more unhappy, suffer more from depression and anxiety than people in poor countries. The more you have the more you are risking when change comes.

Maybe the only difference between children and adults is that we are better at making up excuses and lie to ourselves about things. Instead of crying and screaming and then accepting we sometimes spend years and years avoiding the world as it is.